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Conquering Mommy Guilt

Conquering Mommy Guilt

As a mom, you set expectations for yourself. They’re probably high. And, chances are, you probably don’t always meet them.

You know what?

It’s OK.

Repeat after us: No one is perfect.

But that doesn’t mean the mommy guilt you feel isn’t real. The trick is learning how to overcome it. By recognizing some common “guilt triggers,” you can also learn to give yourself a bit of a break.

Loving Every Minute of It

Before your baby was born, you may have thought you would love every moment of being a mom. But now that your baby is here you realize you don’t. Let’s be honest - that’s a pretty tall order, and babies are A LOT of work. You love your baby, but sometimes you need a break. In fact, taking that break can help you be a better mom. So recognize that not every moment with your child is sunshine and roses, take a little time for yourself, and let that guilt go.

You’re Doing it Wrong

Everywhere you turn, parenting advice is at your fingertips, whether it’s from experts online, your mom, or the neighbor next door. It’s great that answers to your questions are so readily available, but it can also make you question yourself endlessly - especially when the advice is conflicting. At some point, you need to choose a trusted source (like your pediatrician) and trust yourself. Remember - there’s more than one way to be a great mom.

It Doesn’t All Have to be Quality Time

We live in a very child-focused society, and it’s easy to feel like every moment you spend with your child needs to be enriching. But let’s get real - whether you’re a stay-at-home mom or not, that’s just not realistic. Sometimes, you need to do the laundry or make a meal. And during those times, it’s perfectly OK for your child to be safely engaged in an age-appropriate activity, alone. We’ll let you in on a little secret - kids learn and grow from spending time on their own, too. So relax, mom.

While that mom guilt is most certainly real, don’t let it consume you. Learn to recognize when it’s creeping in and then, “Let it Go.”